Jan 18, 2013

The BEST Blog Button How-To & Revision

First, see those cute social media buttons over on the right?  I have wanted to add those bad boys for months, people, months.  And I could never figure out how to get it to work until I found this site. It is seriously the EASIEST way to add them!  You don't even need the photo bucket if you have found buttons you like somewhere else, just the image URL.  Go open the link, and when you are done reading this post, go have lots of fun playing with buttons :)

Ever had that experience where you are doing something and you think you know a lot about it and then it smacks you square in the face that you don't? That has been me and revision.

This is probably closer to reality.
It took me just over a year to write the draft of the book I'm working on, and I know in this blogosphere, that is a LONG time, but it really was an education in time management, awareness of what I really want in life, and a huge education in writing.  The really nice thing about revision is I can see very quickly how much I have grown from the first chapters to the last.  I can see how much my characters have grown.  I can see how I learned development of setting, action and character in my writing process.

But that means that the revision of these early chapters is something to be reckoned with. I was working on a chapter yesterday where I introduce a new character - I had to find her name to figure out if it really was her because her voice was so WRONG.  When I set out on this revision, I thought if I was slow and meticulous, I could maybe get away with just one and then do line edits, etc. later, but I have a sneaky suspicion that the learning process for revision is just starting.

Have you experienced the distinct awareness of your writing growth?  What has changed most for you?  Have a date with your WIP this weekend?


15 comments :

L. Diane Wolfe said...

I can really see the growth from my first fiction book to the fifth one in my series. I think it's strongest in my second non-fiction though. And it showed me that I write non-fiction better than fiction.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

I've learned that devoting several hours every night to a manuscript means I really can finish it in two months. (Because my first one took over a year and I found the beginning didn't match the end as well.)

ilima said...

I have a date with my WIP today. All day. It's gonna be a long one. :)

Julie Flanders said...

Oh, thank you for sharing how to get those social media buttons! I've been wanting to add those too and haven't been able to figure it out to save my life. Thanks!!

JeffO said...

It's sometimes hard to notice when you're in the middle of stuff how much you've changed, but when I read over the first draft of my current novel and compared it to the first draft of my previous novel, I realized how much better I had gotten.

At least, I think so.

Elizabeth Seckman said...

I'm coming back later when I have time to work on those. The new blog looks great. You've done a wonderful job!

Carrie-Anne said...

Now, as opposed to 15-20 years ago, I'm at a place where I love editing, rewriting, revising, and polishing. As a teen, I thought I didn't need to change anything, and even when I began transcribing some of my handwritten books or going back to work on typed books, I still only added instead of really taking away. Dross covered by gold is still dross.

My first Russian historical took 8.5 years, but that was over three major periods, not 8.5 straight years, and much of this time was when I had to wait my turn to use my parents' computer. And the book is a saga, not all of 300 pages.

S.P. Bowers said...

Yes, I could see my growth and had to completely rewrite parts of the first draft because they were so off. The good thing is that means I'm improving.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

I see so many bad habits in my earlier writing that I hope I no longer make. Have fun with revisions.

Kristin Baker said...

Ugh, revisions. I'm getting close to that time again. Actually, I'll have two first drafts to revise, but one of them can wait since it's the sequel of a book that isn't published yet. Oh wait...THAT book also needs another rewrite! (After I'd thought I was done rewriting it.) AAAK!! *finally loses my mind completely and runs out barefoot into the snow*

Angela Cothran said...

I've been sending my chapters to my CP as I draft. That has really pushed me to write fast :) Love your new look.

Jeff Hargett said...

What I've found is that my storytelling approach evolves over time. This becomes problematic when it takes a long time to complete a story because the level and types of edits required often change with the age of each manuscript section. Quite enlightening and a bit frustrating too. ;-)

city said...

thanks for share.

Nicole said...

It usually takes me about a year to do the first draft...but the quality of my drafts has hugely improved over the year.

Peggy Eddleman said...

I had a book that took me about a year to write, and it was during a year where I had advanced in my writing by leaps and bounds. Those first few chapters were so daunting to even think about revising!

I do have a date with my WIP. I just got my editorial letter in the mail today.