Apr 2, 2013

A to Z - Blackberry Winter

Welcome to A to Z! This year, I'm highlighting women's fiction books (and probably instilling a decent amount of cover love in the process).

B is for Blackberry Winter by Sarah Jio.


Synopsis from Goodreads: Seattle, 1933. Single mother Vera Ray kisses her three-year-old son, Daniel, goodnight and departs to work the night-shift at a local hotel. She emerges to discover that a May-Day snow has blanketed the city, and that her son has vanished. Outside, she finds his beloved teddy bear lying face-down on an icy street, the snow covering up any trace of his tracks, or the perpetrator's.

Seattle, 2010. Seattle Herald reporter Claire Aldridge, assigned to cover the May 1 "blackberry winter" storm and its twin, learns of the unsolved abduction and vows to unearth the truth. In the process, she finds that she and Vera may be linked in unexpected ways...

I loved the writing of this book. The way that the plot transitions through the two time periods is seamless and beautiful. I felt like I knew Vera and Claire so well, felt the hope and heartbreak each had experienced, and never wished one time period would end so I could get back to the other. The description is precise without being overbearing. Sarah Jio is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors.

Have you heard of Sarah Jio (she will make an appearance later in the A to Z challenge again). Can you think of another story that transitions between time periods well?


13 comments :

YVONNE LEWIS: said...

This sounds a wonderful book and look forward to the author in the course of the A to Z,
Yvonne.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Haven't heard of this one. The cover art is very nice though.

Nick Wilford said...

Sounds very nice. Cloud Atlas is a good one that moves between many time periods.

J. A. Bennett said...

Wow, I really like the premise for this one. I might just have to pick it up :)

ilima said...

The Forgotten Garden comes to mind with the time transitions. That'd be cool to write something like that one day.

Donna K. Weaver said...

Ilima, that's what I was just thinking. I loved The Forgotten Garden. Sad but compelling. This book sounds great.

Robin said...

Smooth time transitions are tricky. Nice the you found one that does it so well. Have you read Connie Willis. She does time transitions (and time travel) brilliantly. <3<3<3

Julie Luek said...

I have a tough time reading books or watching movies involving child abductions-- it preys on my worse fear as a mama!

Laura said...

never heard of her- I'm going to have to look her up I thinks- sounds like a great premise
Lx

Daniel B. said...

At the risk of sounding like a fantasy geek, I'll cite Brandon Sanderson's Way of Kings as a book that transitions between two time periods, separated by a thousand years. He does it well, though I'd never recommend making the attempt to a novice writer. It can lose the reader fast.

Jess Stork said...

It will be interesting hearing about women's fiction from you. About as close as I get to that is a YA romance by Cassandra Clare. It will be interesting to expand my horizons

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

I can think of Justin Cronin who write The Twelve.
This book sounds good but sad.

Krista McLaughlin said...

I've never heard of her, but I like the idea behind her book. It sounds sad, but good at the same time. Those are my favorite kinds of books. :)